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Google at the Kirchberg Dock. On Delisting Requests, and on the Territorial Reach of the EU’s GDPR (C-136/17 GC and Others v CNIL, C‑507/17 Google Inc v CNIL) journal article

Yuliya Miadzvetskaya, Geert Van Calster

European Data Protection Law Review, Volume 6 (2020), Issue 1, Page 143 - 151

Case C-136/17 GC and Others v Commission nationale de l'informatique et des libertés (CNIL) and Case C‑507/17 Google Inc v Commission nationale de l’informatique et des libertés (CNIL), Judgements of the Court of Justice of the European Union of 24 September 2019 Google is of course no stranger to the courtrooms at the Court of Justice of the European Union. Data protection laws are far from the only EU law subject-matter on which it acts (competition policy is a sector that springs to mind). In this case-note, we combine the review of the Court’s judgements in both C-136/17 GC and Others v Commission nationale de l'informatique et des libertés (CNIL) and C-505/17 Google Inc v Commission nationale de l’informatique et des libertés (CNIL). Article 16 TFEU – Articles 8, 9, 12 and 14 of the Data Protection Directive – Articles 9, 10 and 17 of the General Data Protection Regulation – Articles 7, 8 and 11 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU


Legal Issues in Regulating Observational Studies: journal article

The impact of the GDPR on Italian Biomedical Research

Paola Aurucci

European Data Protection Law Review, Volume 5 (2019), Issue 2, Page 197 - 208

This article aims to show the legal challenges rising from the use, reuse, linkage and analysis of sensitive data in observational studies. In order to spell out these challenges and a possible way of meeting them, the first section takes into account the distinctive nature of retrospective observational studies and Big Data anal. The second section shows how the General Data Protection Regulation faces the challenge of maximising the opportunities arising from these studies while protecting the privacy of individual patients through research exemptions. The last section focuses on the Italian data protection regime to show why delegation of powers back to the national legal systems of the Member States entails a number of critical drawbacks, like hampering the progress of medical research. Keywords: GDPR, Data Protection, Medical Research, Sensitive Data

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